safe fuel tanks

How to Prevent Microbial Growth in Bunded Fuel Tanks?

What are the odds that bunded tanks will harbor microbes and other organisms not seen by the naked eye? There is a big certainty on this.

Bunded fuel tanks and other similar fuel liquid containment systems are more than ideal thriving places for all types of bacteria, both aerobic and anaerobic. Provided, of course, that conditions right inside your tank and the surrounding environment are conducive for them to thrive and grow.

By leaving bacterial growth sitting in your bunded diesel tanks for an extended period of time, it will run the risk of developing dirty muck at the bottom part of your tank. This can grow over time and may even reach your filter and strainer systems, clogging them in the process.

Diesel Microbial Contamination Testing

Aside from this, muck that has been long-seated inside your bunded fuel tank will promote premature corrosion of your tank walls. But the worst part here is that it can spoil your stored fuel, adversely affecting its quality and reliability. 

Ways to Prevent Microbial Growth in Bunded Fuel Tanks

When it comes to dealing with a microbial infestation in bunded fuel tanks, nothing can be more effective in keeping bacterial infestation at bay than by prevention. Keep your fuel tank clean, this is one of the best practices you need to know and by keeping that as a habit, there is a very slim chance for a microbial or fungal infection to occur in your tank.

Prevention of infestation in the bunded fuel tank can be classified in the following: 

a) A fuel monitoring program for the microbes

b) Fuel system maintenance

c) Fuel treatment

Fuel Monitoring

What is involved here is fuel sampling and periodic testing. The working idea here is to mitigate such problems occurring and can be made possible by detecting microbial presence right at its outset. 

Fuel System Maintenance

Water acts as a catalyst for microbial and fungal growth. Therefore, the presence of which can eventually trigger unwanted infestation and by keeping water out of your fuel tank, you are mitigating the chances of bacterial growth. You can do this in a number of ways. Like for instance, you can recycle your fuel via water separations. You can also discharge the water bottoms routinely, this is where microbes are likely to develop first. Another technique you can consider is fuel tank insulation. This procedure will stabilize the temperature of your fuel and by doing so, your fuel will be rendered as inhospitable to microbes and thus prevents them from thriving. 

Fuel Treatment

The most bottom part of fuel and water tanks must be treated. This measure will help control the spread of microbes inside your safe fuel tanks. If the infestation has developed sludge or biomass ( it is that dark and slimy waste product of bacteria), this too must be removed as soon as possible. A high diesel microbial growth remover can help you prevent this scenario from ever happening. 

In choosing a high-grade remover, there are several factors that you need to take into account. 

  1. It should be soluble in your liquid fuel and water.
  2. It is compatible with your system components.
  3. It should be compatible with fuel and other additives
  4. The amount of time the product will take to exterminate the microbes
  5. Regulatory and industry approvals.